Awareness of ChatGPT Among Medical Students and Trainee/Residents

Awareness of ChatGPT Among Medical Students and Trainee/Residents

Authors

  • Hina Lateef
  • Rabia Arshad
  • Eman Ayesha
  • Sumera Hanif,
  • Aroosha Zainab
  • Omera Naseer

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21649/jspark.v3i1.375

Keywords:

ChatGPT, Awareness, Medical students, Residents

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to assess the awareness of ChatGPT among medical students and postgraduate trainees.Study Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study Place and duration of study: Study was conducted for a period of three months from May to July 2023 at BMY Health. Methodology: Our study targeted 370 medical students and postgraduate trainees from reputable institutions across Punjab using a convenient sampling technique. The data collection tool was a structured online questionnaire that assessed the participant's
familiarity with ChatGPT, perceived usefulness, and intentions to use it in the future. Results: Most of the respondents (78%) were from the age group 20-30yr. Among the respondents 54.7% (204) were females. Study reveals that males are more active users (27.2% using once weekly) as compared to females (19.2% using once weekly). 41.5% (39) of male MBBS students reported having full knowledge of ChatGPT compared to 30% (18) of female MBBS students. 28.6% (16) of male postgraduate trainees said they have full knowledge of ChatGPT compared to 10.3% (7) of female postgraduate trainees. 31.6% (6) of male BDS students have full knowledge of ChatGPT as compared to 9.1% (7) of female BDS students. Conclusion: Medical students and trainees have moderate awareness of ChatGPT but positively perceive its utility in clinical decision-making, research, and education.

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Published

2024-02-12 — Updated on 2024-02-12

How to Cite

Lateef, H., Arshad, R., Ayesha, E., Hanif, S., Zainab, A., & Naseer, O. (2024). Awareness of ChatGPT Among Medical Students and Trainee/Residents. Journal of Society of Prevention, Advocacy and Research KEMU, 3(1), 34–40. https://doi.org/10.21649/jspark.v3i1.375

Issue

Section

Research Articles
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